Training in Assam Plantations Aims to Mitigate Human-Elephant Conflict

Training in Assam Plantations Aims to Mitigate Human-Elephant Conflict
Training in Assam Plantations Aims to Mitigate Human-Elephant Conflict
Training in Assam Plantations Aims to Mitigate Human-Elephant Conflict
Training in Assam Plantations Aims to Mitigate Human-Elephant Conflict

Training in Assam Plantations Aims to Mitigate Human-Elephant Conflict

Training in Assam Plantations Aims to Mitigate Human-Elephant Conflict

Training in Assam Plantations Aims to Mitigate Human-Elephant Conflict

In a collaborative effort, Aaranyak, a leading biodiversity conservation organization, partnered with the British Asian Trust and received support from the Darwin Initiative to conduct a transformative training workshop in Sadiya, Tinsukia district of Assam. The focus of the initiative was on Bhut Jolokia (King Chilli) plantations as an alternative crop, aimed at mitigating the escalating Human-Elephant Conflict (HEC) and providing sustainable livelihoods for affected communities.

Addressing Human-Elephant Conflict Through Diversification

The training, held in collaboration with Krishi Vigyan Kendra Tinsukia, enlisted the expertise of Dr. Sarodee Boruah, who educated 19 villagers from nearby areas. The primary focus was on pest control management, offering practical solutions to crop infestation challenges arising from HEC.

Aaranyak’s press statement highlighted the multifaceted approach required to address HEC, including measures like creating elephant corridors, habitat protection, awareness programs, and the promotion of alternative crops such as Bhut Jolokia.

Beyond Bhut Jolokia: Cultivating Assam Lemon for Sustainable Solutions

In addition to Bhut Jolokia, the training encompassed the cultivation of Assam Lemon (Kaji Nemu) plantations. Recognized for its aromatic flavor and health benefits, Kaji Nemu, recently declared Assam’s state fruit, serves a dual purpose by acting as bio fences to mitigate HEC and providing an additional income source for locals.

Aaranyak, committed to mitigating human-elephant conflict, provided partial support to local villagers by supplying lemon saplings. The training included hands-on demonstrations, a pre-post evaluation, and the distribution of lemon saplings to encourage community members to enhance their income levels sustainably. This holistic approach aligns with Aaranyak’s dedication to conservation and community well-being in northeast India and Assam.

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